Hispanic culture caring for elderly. Aging in America: The Latino perspective 2019-01-06

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Aging in America: The Latino perspective

hispanic culture caring for elderly

Often family members, neighbors and friends provide both direct and indirect caregiving services. In percentage terms, the 2002 Hispanic persons made up 5. In order to enhance participation, culturally appropriate recruitment methods were employed including face-to-face communications, personalized bilingual telephone follow ups, and culturally adapted brochures with study information. Spanish language handouts are available from several Internet sources. The findings indicated that there was a significant difference between Mexican-American and non-Latino White elders in their caregiver preferences.

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Aging in America: The Hispanic Paradox

hispanic culture caring for elderly

Ethics of Care Tronto 1996 outlined three areas of caregiving that are central to an ethics of care grounded on relational values. Género, pobreza y cuidado: La experiencia de mujeres cuidadoras pobres urbanas. However, several factors, such as longer life spans, female employment, the decline of two-parent families, and long-distance migration by children, may increase the number of older individuals who do not have a support system immediately available. As with any patient, Latinos should be treated as individuals first, while exploring possible cultural distinctions. The expanded family life cycle: Individual, family, and social perspectives. In: Caring for Patients from Different Cultures.

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Aging in America: The Hispanic Paradox

hispanic culture caring for elderly

Residents admitted to nursing homes have often already endured hospitalizations or a health issue that required expensive, high-level care. Education On average, older Hispanic American adults have less formal education than the older American population overall. What older people want from long-term care, and how they can get it. Reducing Stress on the Family Despite the stress of caring for the elderly, Hispanic families do reap benefits from integrating elderly family members. That number should rise to 4.

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Cultural Values of Latino Patients and Families

hispanic culture caring for elderly

Improving care for ethnic minority elderly and their family caregivers across the spectrum of dementia severity. Vincent Mor, chair of the Department of Community Health, was a lead author in that study and is a co-author in the new work looking at nursing home care for Hispanics. According to the , the Latino older population is projected to grow from 2. Likewise, because elders will recognize that the end of their life is near, they may become afraid and need consideration, affection, and family members who can simply be there, to hear their stories and to bear witness to their lives and final bereavement related to the losses experienced in old age. However, a larger proportion of the same group of Mexican-born and U. Latinos are far more likely than the overall population to live in poverty; the poverty rate in 2006 was 20.


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The Rewards and Burdens of Hispanic Family Caregiving

hispanic culture caring for elderly

The high unemployment rate for Latinos — 11. Likewise, the extant literature does not articulate how Latina caregivers negotiate their performance of the caregiving role when dementia in their parents challenges their enactment of and respect for traditional cultural scripts ; Ibarra. A high-carbohydrate and high-calorie diet, a more sedentary lifestyle in the United States, and genetic factors may contribute. Culturally competent care necessitates cross-cultural training, which is increasingly included in medical education, but with the realization that cultural competency is a lifelong learning process rather than an end in itself. The members of these groups have unique languages, cultures and religions, and are diverse in terms of education levels and socioeconomic status.

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Cultural Diversity and Caregiving

hispanic culture caring for elderly

Cultural beliefs and health care practices of childbearing Puerto Rican American women and Mexican American women: A review of the literature. In line with this perspective, they may believe that they have no responsibility for elderly relatives. During the interview, Ana expressed interest in learning more about dementia and the management of behavioral symptoms. Doctors are focusing, for example, on what appears to be a heightened risk for Latinos from Alzheimer's disease. The point deserves emphasis: Health care providers must be cautious not to oversimplify the values, customs, and beliefs that characterize any ethnic group-especially one as heterogeneous as Latinos. None of the respondents reported a previous hip fracture injury.

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Cultural Values and Caregiver Preference for Mexican

hispanic culture caring for elderly

Adding to the language barrier is the pitfall of false fluency, when physicians mistake the meaning of a Spanish word because of unfamiliarity with cultural or linguistic subtleties. Thirty-two percent called that extremely or very likely, compared with 20 percent of non-Hispanics, yet only 1 in 10 Hispanics reported doing much planning for their own long-term care. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Some individuals demonstrate greater acceptance of and conformity to the ideology or values than does their actual behavioral performance of familistic ideals. National reports have identified such factors as low socioeconomic status and the health care delivery system that do not consistently consider the cultural relevance of services as comprising some of the underlying causes for the persistent ethnic disparities in health care access and outcomes ; ;. These were used in a previous study to tap cultural dimensions related to familism, family harmony, and attitude toward care in a nursing home.

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NRSG833

hispanic culture caring for elderly

Results for the full survey have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3. We need to be reminded that the kind of care we receive in our later years will be only as good as the care we provide for our elderly today. In general, caregiving was talked about in terms of reciprocity and obligation and the enactment of filial duty. Hispanic culture emphasizes respect for elders, and this is reflected in how their elders are treated. Nativity, declining health, and preferences in living arrangements among elderly Mexican Americans: Implications for long-term care. Modesty is also a factor for Latinos and Asians.

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